Visiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of Regensburg

Visiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of Regensburg

In a city that dates back to 72 AD, as you wander the cobblestone streets you can’t help but admire the the details throughout the historic city of Regensburg, Germany.  Today I’m looking at the doors and architecture of Regensburg.  This includes its old world architecture of buildings big and small to one of my favorite elements, doors. Combine this with great history and there’s always something to see and learn in even the smallest of things.

Visiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of RegensburgVisiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of RegensburgVisiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of Regensburg

I was admiring this door and the arch before I noticed the plaque placed nearby.  This is the house where Dr. Johann Maier, a Regensburg preacher once lived.  He was born on June 23, 1906 and as the sign states, “died on 24 April 1945 as a victim of Nazi terror.” On 22 April 1945 when US Army tanks reached the Danube, Dr. Maier spoke to the townspeople and called for a peaceful handover of the town.  Before he ever finished, he was seized by police and sentenced to death by hanging.  Later the SS and the Wehrmacht (German Armed Forces) left town and Regensburg fell without a fight to the US Army.

Visiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of Regensburg

Look closer at this clock on the side of this building in Altstadt (Old Town) and you’ll notice it has zodiac signs in place of numbers.  How unusual is that? It’s actually not that unusual, especially when you think of other clocks like Prague’s Astronomical Clock.  The zodiacal ring was used to indicate the location of the Sun on the ecliptic,  the apparent path of the Sun on the celestial sphere.  So what looks like a clock is so much more than a clock.

Visiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of Regensburg

In front of this building you can’t help but notice the statue of a man on his horse.  Perched up high on that horse is Ludwig I of Bavaria, who reigned from 1825-1848. Ludwig was an interesting man who’s rule was strongly affected by his love of the arts, specifically the Greek and Italian Renaissance, as well as for women.  It was Ludwig I who conceived the idea of the Walhalla Temple, a hall of fame modeled on the Parthenon, that honors laudable and distinguished people, famous personalities in German history – politicians, sovereigns, scientists and artists of the German tongue.

Look at the detail on this building and you can’t help but admire the amount of time it had to have taken to create.

Visiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of RegensburgVisiting Bavaria: Doors and Architecture of Regensburg

No matter where you turn and look, there’s something amazing to see from the much expected and anticipated Bavarian style as well as the many frescoes, statues, and other art dotted throughout the city. When you visit a city for the first time, don’t overlook the small details in addition to running to the major sights as there is always beauty in even the smallest of things.

Have you ever discovered something amazing that you might have otherwise overlooked while traveling?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.